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Rabid is now Ackama

In September 2018, on the company’s 8th birthday, Rabid became Ackama - this was to reflect that fact that we work on large digital ecosystems, and given that nature is the largest ecosystem in the world we wanted a name that came from nature. Ackama, or Makamaka, is a small bushy tree with white flowers and red seeds. It’s found on the coast from Whangarei north.

Go to the Ackama blog

Ben Bradshaw

On changing languages, frameworks and teams.

“Learning is a treasure that will follow its owner everywhere” - Chinese Proverb

Hi. I’m Ben Bradshaw, I’m a geek, coder, Firefly fan and a bunch of other things including the newest Rabid employee in Wellington. It’s been close to 4 months since I started here and in that time I’ve changed programming languages, frameworks and teams not to mention offices, clients, and generally everything.

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Daniel Spector

We acquired a company.

That’s so cool.

OK, OK, so it isn’t a big company, but it is an awesome one.

Resistor’s principals, James and Henry, are impressive senior-senior devs who’ve worked on a bunch of interesting projects, both in their pre-Resistor careers and then in developing the Resistor team. Resistor’s team has a broad background and can take on nearly anything, from innovative core software for startups to architecting large enterprise development.

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Rabid Technologies Ltd.

Wellington developer Rabid acquires Auckland's Resistor

Wellington based software consultancy Rabid has acquired Auckland development house Resistor for an undisclosed sum.

Rabid’s CEO, Breccan Mcleod-Lundy, says the acquisition accomplishes three goals.

“It reassures our Auckland client base by making our presence there physical, it significantly increases our export business and, importantly, gives us another team of strong developers to keep up with demand”.

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Sandra Clark

Learning to tweet at the Agile NZ Conference

Two major things happened on the 1st and 2nd of September: I attended the AgileNZ 2015 conference and I learned to tweet.

The second part may sound ridiculous, but it was a big hurdle for me. I am surrounded by fabulous tech people who tweet beautifully and prolifically. I couldn’t tweet to save myself, so I saw the Agile Conference as a perfect opportunity to face my fear and learn. I received great advice from Cara Hill - follow the conference Twitter account and hashtag, retweet and build up to your own tweets - and I followed this advice to the letter.

First tweet

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Cara Hill

WDCNZ 2015: 'Surely it's just an if statement'

(Title credit to Amanda Dorrell from her WDCNZ talk “The fuzzy line between design and development”)

I had heard what a great event WDCNZ was after my husband, Samson Ootoowak (a Ruby on Rails and JavaScript developer - he was a Ruby teacher at Enspiral Dev Academy and still works for them on the contracting side of things), attended last year and raved about it. So while I was a student at EDA and WDCNZ tickets went on sale at Early Bird prices (March? April? Around then), we bought two at Sam’s insistence. I had obviously never been to a web dev conference (I’d only ever attended disappointing Arts conferences at that point) and was looking forward to going to such a good one. I also had no idea whether or not I would have a job by the time of the conference, but figured that most companies wouldn’t mind letting me go. I just started with Rabid Technologies on Monday, and they were more than happy for me to take off Thursday - my fourth day on the job - to go to the conference.

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